AN EXACT REPLICA OF A FIGMENT OF MY IMAGINATION PDF

Yet, ultimately, “An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination” is sad, at times even tear-inducing, since McCracken offers an unstinting. I was sitting at a table, having signed three books, one for a cheerful old lady who ‘d called my short stories pointless during the Q & A. Al’s wife. Review: An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination by Elizabeth McCrackenA mother’s tender remembrance of her stillborn baby moves.

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Return to Book Page. A prize-winning, successful novelist in her 30s, McCracken was happy to be an itinerant writer and self-proclaimed spinster. But suddenly she fell in love, got married, and two years ago was living in a remote part of France, working on her novel “This is the happiest story in the world with the saddest ending,” writes Elizabeth McCracken in her powerful, inspiring imatination.

But suddenly she fell in love, got married, and two years ago was living in a remote part of France, working on her novel, and waiting for the birth of her first child. This book is about what happened next. In her ninth month of pregnancy, she learned that her baby boy had died. How do you deal with and recover from this kind of loss? Of course you don’t–but you go on. And if you have ever experienced loss or love someone who has, the company of this remarkable book will help you go on.

Hardcoverpages. Published September 10th by Little Brown and Company.

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. Will the book imagunation sense to someone who has no children?

Kristine It’s not so much that it ‘won’t make sense’ as it won’t hit home for that person the same way it would for someone who has lost a child.

An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination by Elizabeth McCracken

That said, I …more It’s not so much that it ‘won’t make sense’ as it won’t hit home for that person the same way it would for someone who has lost a child. That said, I guess all books hit each person differently for different reasons. After the loss of my one day old daughter, everyone kept giving me books to read mostly on surviving loss. This is the first and really only book that really spoke to me and let me know that I wasn’t alone and that there is a light at the end of the long tunnel of grief.

That was 7 years ago.

I still think back to the positive surge of emotion from this book and am thankful I found it. Lists with This Book. McCracken and her husband, a fellow writer and professor, had sojourned in Berlin, Ireland and England before settling into a ramshackle farmhouse in the Bordeaux region of France to await the birth of their first child.

The pregnancy went beautifully; it was an idyllic time in their marriage. By the time she made it to a hospital, her son was dead.

An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination by Elizabeth McCracken

She had to go through the agony of labor only to produce a tiny corpse. Every line is worth rereading and quoting. Saying something is what matters, rather than pretending nothing has happened. I have certainly been guilty imaginnation this crime of omission. McCracken and her husband rigment have two children, but there is no replacing Pudding. Mar 08, Marcie rated it it was amazing Shelves: It’s so hard to find the right words to describe this beautifully written poignant book.

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It sat on my to-read list for about a year and I put off reading it in large part because I became pregnant with my first child shortly after adding it to my list. I didn’t want to freak myself out Then, when I lost my baby 4 days before his due date, it became an urgency to get my hands on it as if I could somehow procure the answers to my own situation by simply reading a book.

I imaagination it esact from a li It’s so hard to find the right words to describe this beautifully written poignant book. I checked it out from a library 6 days after my son’s death. It didn’t offer me ov, there are no answers for losses such as these, but it gave me something else far more valuable – a deep connection to another women in my situation. I’m so grateful I mj this book to turn to through the first month of my grief.

Early on in the book McCracken states that this is the happiest story in the world with the saddest ending, cigment I found the opposite to be just as equally true.

This book is incredibly sad – there is no question about it. It is also one of the happiest books I’ve ever read about losing a baby. It is brimming with both despair and hope. I related to it on so many levels and was often stunned by some of the similarities to my own situation and thoughts. I found it so much more comforting than anything about angels or going towards the light. It embraces the the reality of the here and now instead of trying to find easy solutions, gloss over the ugly parts, od build up the spiritual unknown.

It just accepts the seamless mingling of grief, pain, love, and joy as they are. I thought it was funny that she wished for a book that shared the lighter side of losing a child because, through her honesty, optimism, and resilience, she manages to produce that very book for others. This is a must-read for anybody who has lost a baby or for anybody that wishes to better understand someone imaginaiton has.

View all 6 comments. Apr 04, S rated it really liked it. I read this book on a recommendation of a friend who is familiar with the fact that I have gone through a similar experience in my own life. I, too, have delivered a stillborn son. I think the author did a wonderful job of putting her grief into words. I related to so many things that she said, felt, imaginatjon did. My heart was breaking f I read this book on a recommendation of a friend figmfnt is familiar with the fact that I have gone through a similar experience in my own life.

My heart was breaking for her loss, while simultaneously breaking yet again for our own. I completely agree with her assessment of feeling an immediate bond with those who have a similar experience.

I, too, was able to get pregnant almost immediately after our loss, and I also related to her panic clear through the next pregnancy. In all, I figmsnt it was raw and honest.

Maybe not for everyone.

A poignant matter of life and death

But, for me, good to see my own emotions in writing – knowing I’m not alone in the way I felt and still feel. Well done, and thank you to her for writing it. Dec 30, Katie rated it really liked it. The three of them should replace Hallmark permanently. Dec 21, Christy rated it it was amazing.

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A thin, beautiful, sad – but defiant – book about the loss of a baby. It begins with the flat warning: Amidst the knocking on wood, the name games, and the well-wishes of friends and strangers, something goes very wrong and Pudding dies before birth.

The book is written with a son finally born o A thin, beautiful, sad – but defiant – book about the loss of a baby. The book is written with a son finally born one year and five days after Pudding’s death. It is a love letter to Edward McCracken’s husbanda card to the general public to explain the death of a child never truly disappearsand a story for McCracken’s living son, Gus.

I have never lost a child; I have never thought of the traumatic removal of future hopes and dreams, the amputated feeling of loss that McCracken felt and still feels being the mother of a ghostly son, Pudding, and his very real successor.

An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination by Elizabeth McCracken – PopMatters

McCracken is rsplica, refuses to be over-sentimental, and consistently withholds artifice from the reader. A great, elegiac read. Or 22, Charles rated it it was ok. I am not a curmudgeon. I have several living children. As fxact man, anatomical constraints have established that none has been carried in my womb or delivered through my loins. I have never lost a child; I hope that I never do.

That being stated, writing about a devastatingly sad subject in a lyrical, emotionally honest, heartfelt, warm, sad, funny manner may make a great subject, and may elicit sympathy and empathy those not being bad things at allbut does not necessarily make a great book.

I a I am not a curmudgeon. I am not indifferent to her story, her tragedy, her pain, her deep sadness, and the process — slow, not steady, never assured — of reluctant but necessary acceptance and the lifetime process of healing.

Her pain is real and palpable, and one that I hope I never experience. Nevertheless, while I found the short story to be deeply personal, I concluded that, in essence, it was a self-indulgent eulogy and catharsis. View all 7 comments. Jun 29, Megan rated it it was amazing. I can’t think of two books which approach the same subject matter the death of a loved one more differently. Where Didion is most essentially writing about her own death–at least, the end of her family and context and relevance and time–McCracken is talking about trauma, a personal shame.

Death is a whole different matter for old people than it is for young people. Which probably explains another thing that surprised me about this book: I picked it up in a book store yesterday and finished it last night at 3 AM with the same hideous, gossipy impulses that cause anyone who hasn’t suffered much lately to be interested in the pain of others. And it is to her credit as a writer that Imqgination never lost that part of me–the part that loves a good story.

But three things hit me unexpectedly. When she talks about her friends who were pregnant at the same time as she was who email her pictures of their babies, or say, “How is motherhood?